Scotland sets out policy on improving workforce planning for primary care

Scotland sets out policy on improving workforce planning for primary care

May 9 2018 The Scottish Government has published the third part of its National Health and Social...

DHSC to address concerns of prescription direction to distance selling pharmacies

DHSC to address concerns of prescription direction to distance selling pharmacies

April 19 2018 A government report has identified “strong evidence of prescription...

Study gives pointers on why patients are reluctant to disclose sexual orientation

Study gives pointers on why patients are reluctant to disclose sexual orientation

February 1 2018 A study has flagged up patients’ concerns about the need to disclose their...

  • Scotland sets out policy on improving workforce planning for primary care

    Scotland sets out policy on improving workforce planning for primary care

    Wednesday, 09 May 2018 16:12
  • DHSC to address concerns of prescription direction to distance selling pharmacies

    DHSC to address concerns of prescription direction to distance selling pharmacies

    Thursday, 19 April 2018 16:51
  • Study gives pointers on why patients are reluctant to disclose sexual orientation

    Study gives pointers on why patients are reluctant to disclose sexual orientation

    Thursday, 01 February 2018 11:35

a man taking medication imageFebruary 2 2018

Details of the review into prescribed medicines that may cause dependence or withdrawal have been set out.


Public Health Minister Steve Brine has commissioned Public Health England to review the evidence and report back in early 2019. It has been asked to look at:

  • prevalence and prescribing patterns;
  • the nature and likely causes of dependence or discontinuation syndrome among some people who take these medicines;
  • effective prevention and treatment of dependence and discontinuation syndrome for each drug category.

Drug classes specifically targeted will be benzodiazepines, Z-drugs, GABA-ergic medicines, opioid pain medications, antidepressants, as well as those that are prescribed to treat anxiety, insomnia, chronic non-cancer pain and depression. The review will look at the use of the medicines by adults, and community prescribing.

Not included in the review’s remit are:

  • cancer and terminal pain;
  • over-the-counter medicines;
  • prescribing in hospitals and prisons;
  • other medicines, such as anti-psychotics, stimulants, ‘smart drugs’, or anti-obesity drugs.

PHE will use a number of methods to gather evidence, including “analysing all prescription and some GP patient data to understand prevalence and detail of prescribing patterns, patients and conditions.”

Link:
PHE announcement      

Management News

May 22 2018 ‘Scratch Beneath the Surface’, a new UK public health initiative intended to improve people’s understanding of atopic dermatitis, has been launched online.
May 18 2018 New guidance to support the integration of community pharmacy services into primary care homes (PCHs) has been published.  The National Association of Primary Care’s report looks at ways...