Study gives pointers on why patients are reluctant to disclose sexual orientation

Study gives pointers on why patients are reluctant to disclose sexual orientation

February 1 2018 A study has flagged up patients’ concerns about the need to disclose their...

NHS England extends lease practice incentive scheme to March 31

NHS England extends lease practice incentive scheme to March 31

January 23 2018 A scheme to support any GP practice that is a tenant in an NHS Property Services...

£3.9m boost for GP services in Northern Ireland

£3.9m boost for GP services in Northern Ireland

December 21 2017 General practices in Northern Ireland are to benefit from £3.9 million in...

  • Study gives pointers on why patients are reluctant to disclose sexual orientation

    Study gives pointers on why patients are reluctant to disclose sexual orientation

    Thursday, 01 February 2018 11:35
  • NHS England extends lease practice incentive scheme to March 31

    NHS England extends lease practice incentive scheme to March 31

    Tuesday, 23 January 2018 12:19
  • £3.9m boost for GP services in Northern Ireland

    £3.9m boost for GP services in Northern Ireland

    Thursday, 21 December 2017 10:35

A and EApril 13 2015

There is little evidence to show any benefits of locating primary care-focused unscheduled care centres (UCCs) within hospital emergency departments (EDs), a study has concluded.

Not only are UCCs associated with an increase in attendance, possibly due to provider-induced demand, but the evidence for improved throughput is poor, said the researchers in the Emergency Medicine Journal.

A search of papers on the subject between 1980 and 2015 identified 20 papers suitable for inclusion in the review, with four from England, eight from the Netherlands and the others involving Australia, Ireland, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland.

“The majority of studies described the addition of a GP to manage minor health conditions, with direct substitution for usual ED staff only explicitly described in one paper,” said the researchers. “Much of the impetus for implementing co-located UCCs stems from an accepted theoretical basis supported by individual examples of success in other settings. The evidence base, however, suggests that the expected benefits of the introduction of such a service are not a given, with variable outcomes reported.”

In addition to the “unexpected consequence of a paradoxical increase in demand driven by co-locating services that are meant to reduce such demand”, the researchers noted that “theoretical cost savings are not as expected when subject to closer scrutiny, particularly as most reported savings are based on marginal costs without consideration of capital or indirect expenditure.”

The researchers found scant evidence for a model that is cost neutral across the health community. “Any proposed model, therefore, requires robust evaluation before implementation.”

In an accompanying editorial , Professor Derek Burke, of Sheffield Children’s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, said that before any further major change is contemplated, “we must be absolutely clear about what we are aiming for.” Detailed analyses of current patient flows, including between the various access points, must also be carried out and the impact of changes monitored and rigorously evaluated.

“Failure to rigorously plan changes in service provision at best will lead to an expensive and disruptive trial-and-error approach to resource allocation,” he said. “Finally, we must come to accept that unscheduled care is now a consumer item and seen by users as being no different from the availability of 24 hour shopping. In this age of consumer-based healthcare provision, not considering the consumer’s view is a recipe for failure.”

Links:

EMJ announcement

S Ramlakhan et al. ‘Primary care services located with EDs: a review of effectiveness’. Emergency Medicine Journal. Published online April 11 2016

D Burke. Primary care services located with EDs: a review of effectiveness. Emerg Med J. Published online April 11 2016

Management News

February 23 2018 Health Education England has set out educational content expectations for nursing associates who administer medicines to patients.
February 20 2018 New British Thoracic Society guidelines on pleural mesothelioma include some key recommendations for primary care. The BTS guideline give recommendations and good practice points...