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  • NMC issues advice on responding to unexpected incidents emergencies

    NMC issues advice on responding to unexpected incidents emergencies

    Tuesday, 22 August 2017 10:54
  • Scotland announces latest primary care workforce survey

    Scotland announces latest primary care workforce survey

    Tuesday, 15 August 2017 18:12
  • Scottish Government strengthens scheme to encourage overseas doctors to relocate to there

    Scottish Government strengthens scheme to encourage overseas doctors to relocate to there

    Thursday, 10 August 2017 17:00
  • Practice nurse prescribers need to be registered with NHS Prescription Services reminder

    Practice nurse prescribers need to be registered with NHS Prescription Services reminder

    Tuesday, 21 June 2016 10:34

DiabetesUKguide1March 9 2016

A guide to help nurses to improve their diabetes caseload management and develop an insulin delegation programme has been published.

The Diabetes UK Guide ‘How to: Manage insulin administration in the community’ has been designed to help community staff, such as community and district nurses and diabetes specialist nurses (DSNs). It describes insulin delegation as being “when a registered nurse allocates the task of insulin administration to a non-registered practitioner, such as a healthcare assistant.”

Intended benefits from using the guide include that it will:

  • help ensure people with diabetes get the right treatment and care;
  • improve safety by developing the knowledge and skills of community staff;
  • save time and money by ensuring the most effective use of staff time.

The first part of the guide focuses on reviewing the community diabetes caseload in a four-stage process. “It includes guidance on individual patient reviews as well as reviewing the caseload as a whole to understand how care is being delivered.
It will support community teams to think about standards of care, staffing and caseload management processes. The process can lead to nursing time being saved due to more effective working,” says Diabetes UK.

“The second part is a guide for developing an insulin delegation programme. The guide provides step-by-step guidance on developing the right policies and procedures, training and competency assessment, as well as clarifying the question of accountability.”

As the number of older people continues to rise, an increasing number of people will need to manage their diabetes. “This means that community nurses are likely to have a growing caseload of people who require support to manage their diabetes, including being given insulin injections,” said Simon O’Neill, Director of Health Intelligence and Professional Liaison at Diabetes UK. “It is therefore becoming increasingly important that more community staff are given the knowledge and skills to care for people with diabetes.”

Helen Atkins, DSN at University Hospital Leicester, who was part of the working group, added: “We know that this is an area where staff can often feel concerned about issues of accountability. This guide offers solutions to empower community staff to deliver care safely, by developing the knowledge and skills of community staff. There is huge potential to save time and money by ensuring the most effective use of staff time, and improve patient care delivery.”

The guide has been accredited by the Royal College of Nursing, TREND UK and the UK Clinical Pharmacy Association.

DiabetesUKguide

Links:

Diabetes UK announcement

Diabetes UK ‘How to: Manage insulin administration in the community’

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