BMJ: ‘Adding a sulfonylurea to metformin looks safer than switching to one’

BMJ: ‘Adding a sulfonylurea to metformin looks safer than switching to one’

July 25 2018 Switching to sulfonylureas in type 2 diabetes has been linked with an increased risk...

DOACs associated with reduced risk of major bleeding compared to warfarin

DOACs associated with reduced risk of major bleeding compared to warfarin

July 11 2018 Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been associated with reduced risks of major...

Recorded penicillin allergy associated with increased risk of MRSA and C difficile

Recorded penicillin allergy associated with increased risk of MRSA and C difficile

July 3 2018 People who have a record of penicillin allergy are at an increased risk of developing...

Syphilis and gonorrhoea diagnoses see significant increase

Syphilis and gonorrhoea diagnoses see significant increase

June 11 2018 Annual reporting of sexually transmitted infection diagnoses has increased 0.3% in...

Anticholinergics linked to increased risk of dementia

Anticholinergics linked to increased risk of dementia

April 30 2018 Anticholinergic drugs used in helping control some involuntary muscle movement...

  • BMJ: ‘Adding a sulfonylurea to metformin looks safer than switching to one’

    BMJ: ‘Adding a sulfonylurea to metformin looks safer than switching to one’

    Wednesday, 25 July 2018 13:55
  • DOACs associated with reduced risk of major bleeding compared to warfarin

    DOACs associated with reduced risk of major bleeding compared to warfarin

    Wednesday, 11 July 2018 13:11
  • Recorded penicillin allergy associated with increased risk of MRSA and C difficile

    Recorded penicillin allergy associated with increased risk of MRSA and C difficile

    Tuesday, 03 July 2018 16:42
  • Syphilis and gonorrhoea diagnoses see significant increase

    Syphilis and gonorrhoea diagnoses see significant increase

    Monday, 11 June 2018 14:16
  • Anticholinergics linked to increased risk of dementia

    Anticholinergics linked to increased risk of dementia

    Monday, 30 April 2018 12:08

Umesh Modi is a chartered accountant, and Pamini Jatheeskumar is a chartered certified accountant at Silver Levene...
  Don Lavoie is alcohol programme manager at Public Health England and Gul Root is lead...
Don Lavoie is alcohol programme manager at Public Health England and Gul Root is lead pharmacist, Health and Wellbeing Directorate, Public Health England
More inWhite Papers  

vaccinationNovember 6 2015

The Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) of the European Medicines Agency has undetaken a detailed scientific review of the evidence surrounding reports  of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) in young women given human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines.

The European drug regulators concluded that there were no safety concerns linking GlaxoSmithKline's and Merck's cervical cancer vaccines with the two conditions.

The PRAC announced Wednesday that they had found that "evidence does not support a causal link between the vaccines and development of CRPS or POTS".

"There is no reason to change the way the vaccines are used or amend the current product information," it said in a statement.

According to the European agency, worldwide more than 80 million women have received these vaccines. Some European countries have seen upto 90 percent of the recommended age group given the vaccination.

The two vaccines: Cervarix (GSK), and Gardasil (Merck), are given to young women protect them from the human papillomavirus (HPV) related cancers and pre-cancerous conditions, notabely cervical cancer.

The Campaign Director at HPV Action, Peter Baker said, “The EMA Review confirms that concerns about vaccine safety need not be a barrier to extending HPV vaccination to boys. The real safety issue is that, currently, men in the UK are left exposed to HPV infection by unvaccinated women or other men with the result that over 2,000 men a year develop an HPV-related cancer or genital warts.”

According to the European Medicines Agency it is expected the use of the vaccines will help prevent some of the tens of thousands of deaths in Europe each year, related to cervical cancer, not to mention other forms related to HPV.

"The benefits of HPV vaccines ... continue to outweigh their risks," it said. "The safety of these vaccines, as with all medicines, will continue to be carefully monitored."

David Winterflood, of the HPV and Anal Cancer Foundation said, 'We welcome the EMA’s review into the safety of the HPV vaccine. We can eradicate the human papillomavirus (HPV) and protect young people from 5% of cancers by vaccinating both boys and girls against HPV. Polio and smallpox have effectively been eliminated through successful immunisation programmes; we need to take the steps to add HPV to that list.'

Links:

HPV action

Anal Cancer Foundation

EMA Announcement

Clinical News

July 31 2018 General practices employing pharmacists are citing improved capacity to see patients and workload changes as the main benefits of the scheme.
July 25 2018 Switching to sulfonylureas in type 2 diabetes has been linked with an increased risk of complications compared with staying on metformin, a BMJ study has concluded. However, the study has...