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  • FDC Int recalls a batch of sodium cromoglicate eye drops and of Murine Hayfever Relief

    FDC Int recalls a batch of sodium cromoglicate eye drops and of Murine Hayfever Relief

    Tuesday, 31 July 2018 15:24
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    Thursday, 28 June 2018 16:55
  • Recall issued for several own label glycerine and blackcurrant cough syrups

    Recall issued for several own label glycerine and blackcurrant cough syrups

    Wednesday, 20 June 2018 18:29

Umesh Modi is a chartered accountant, and Pamini Jatheeskumar is a chartered certified accountant at Silver Levene...
  Don Lavoie is alcohol programme manager at Public Health England and Gul Root is lead...
Don Lavoie is alcohol programme manager at Public Health England and Gul Root is lead pharmacist, Health and Wellbeing Directorate, Public Health England
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commoncoldFebruary 15 2016

Patients’ lack of awareness of the progress of a typical cold could be causing thousands of unnecessary GP appointments each winter, a survey has suggested.

A survey of 2,000 people found that 71% think that symptoms of a common cold should only be present for three to six days. Almost a fifth of respondents claimed they would visit their GP if they had been experiencing cold or flu symptoms during the first week of a cold.

Asked “If you experience cold/flu symptoms, how long would you wait before visiting a GP?” respondents said:

  • 1-2 days: 3%,
  • 3-4 days:7 %,
  • 5-6 days: 11 %,
  • 7-10 days:13 %,
  • 11-13 days: 6%,
  • 2 weeks: 9%,
  • 3 weeks: 3%,
  • 4-6 weeks: 2%,
  • wouldn’t plan to visit: 46%

PAGB, the organisation representing OTC medicines manufacturers, conducted the survey in September 2015. It has pointed out that NHS Choices recommends people should only see their GP if the symptoms of a cold persist for more than three weeks, or if there are complications such as breathing difficulties, chest pain or coughing up bloodstained mucus.

"This confusion could be causing thousands of unnecessary doctors’ appointments each year and putting additional strain on NHS services,” said PAGB. “One of the most common reasons people (36%) visit the GP when suffering with self-treatable winter conditions is because they want or think they need antibiotics.

“A further 7% also visit their doctor to get recommendations on the medicines they should take to treat their symptoms, advice they can easily obtain from a pharmacist. Over a third or people (37%) also admitted that they never use their pharmacist as a source of health information.”

PAGB

PAGB’s Chief executive, John Smith, said: “Too many people are still unsure on how long symptoms of self-treatable conditions such as colds should last for and don’t know how to effectively manage the symptoms themselves without visiting their GP.

“On average, over an hour a day of every GP’s time is spent discussing self-treatable conditions, such as coughs and colds, even though people are advised to not to see their GP unless symptoms are still present after three weeks.”

Link:

PAGB announcement

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